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Lexington District One students show strong ACT performance

Nov 05 2019

The district’s average score ranks fifth in the state.

Data from the annual ACT® Condition of College and Career Readiness report shows that Lexington County School District One’s mean composite scores topped the state’s mean composite scores in all subjects in the ACT assessment. 

Following the national trend, Lexington District One’s mean composite score (20.3) rose slightly from 2018 (19.6), topping the 2019 state public school average of 18.6 and ranking slightly lower than the national average of 20.7. The highest score available on the ACT is 36. 

Lexington District One graduates recorded higher scores than the state average in each of the four subject areas, including English, mathematics, reading and science. The average district score in the individual subject areas rose slightly.
In South Carolina, 33,834 public school test takers from the class of 2019 took the ACT as juniors.

 

Average ACT Score (Composite and By Subject)

    Lexington District One    South Carolina
Overall Score    2019 2018    2019 2018
English   20.3 19.6   18.6 18.0
Mathematics   19.5 18.6   17.5 16.9
Reading   20.0 19.4   18.5 18.0
Science   20.5 19.9   18.7 18.3

  

Lexington District One’s composite ACT scores for graduating seniors since 2015:

Class of 2015 — 22.2 (824 students tested)
Class of 2016 — 19.9 (1,622 students tested)
Class of 2017 — 19.9 (1,689 students tested)
Class of 2018 — 19.6 (1,639 students tested)
Class of 2019 — 20.3 (1,149 students tested)

Beginning with the class of 2016, all students in their third year of high school were required to participate in ACT testing. This resulted in almost double the number of students in each cohort taking the test. Since many students who would not normally have taken the ACT participated, the scores dropped. Since that time, however, the scores have remained relatively stable.

During the 2018–2019 school year, eleventh graders, the class of 2019, had the option of taking either the ACT or the SAT college readiness assessment. As a result, the number of students who took the ACT decreased.

While ACT scores are only one measure of our students’ achievement, teachers and administrators regularly review assessment data to determine instructional deficits and provide strategies for addressing those areas. Depending on the areas of need, these strategies can include modifications to the curriculum, professional learning opportunities for teachers and/or implementation of research-based instructional methods.

Academic success in Lexington District One can be attributed to high-quality teachers providing rigorous instruction.